Anthropology

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Anthropologists Investigate!

Enroll in the Anthropology Program at Skyline College for an enriching and challenging academic experience that focuses on exploring the great breadth of the human experience and viewing current events through the lens of that diversity. We offer two Associate Degrees for a clear path for transfer to a four-year institution.

student takes notes in a notebook

Anthropologists seek to investigate, record and understand the cultures and traditions of other times and places in order to better understand human diversity. In so doing, anthropologists play crucial roles in contemporary social and political debate and advocacy, helping us better understand and engage with our multicultural world.

To succeed in Anthropology, students will develop strong reading, writing, critical thinking and analytical skills, as well as demonstrate a passion for understanding cultures of the present and past from a variety of perspectives.

Career Outlook

Working in the field of Anthropology provides a unique opportunity to study the diversity of human experience, and through implementing and sharing this knowledge, help to better understand the world around us. A degree in Anthropology provides a broad base of knowledge that can be applied to a wide range of careers including teaching, government service, law, communications, journalism and more. The demand for jobs and the pay for these careers varies widely across the nation and the State of California.

The State of California Employment Development Department provides an online Occupational Guide that provides helpful job descriptions, job outlooks and wages, and qualification requirements for a wide variety of careers. Use this guide to find more information about a career that may interest you.

Looking for a list of classes offered this semester?

Check out the current class schedule.

All Courses

ANTH 110 Cultural Anthropology (3 units)

A comparative analysis of human cultures with emphases on core concepts such as kinship, religion, politics, technology, and an appreciation of our societal variability. When appropriate, comparison is made with present-day American society to show the effect of societal diversity, size, and complexity of cultural factors.

ANTH 125 Biological Anthropology (3 units)

Biological consideration of the origin, development, and potential survival of humans and other primates. Topics include concepts of evolution: natural selection and populations, patterns of inheritance, the fossil record, and behavioral adaptations. Examines how biological, physical, and cultural variations have allowed human populations to adapt to various physical environments.

ANTH 127 Biological Anthropology Laboratory (1 units)

Laboratory designed to become familiar with the methods of the science of biological anthropology while investigating topics in laboratory and field situations. Topics covered in the course: the scientific method, biological variation and forces of evolution, human osteology and variation, comparative osteology of primates, and fossil evidence for human evolution. Field trips may be offered.

ANTH 150 Introduction to Archaeology: Bones, Beads and the Basics of Material Culture (3 units)

Explores cultural diversity using theories and methods of anthropological archaeology. This course typically includes discussions of the development of archaeological research, excavation methods, data analysis, and selected cultural sequences. Instructor may require field trips.

ANTH 155 Human Prehistory: Discovering Ancient Civilizations (3 units)

An anthropological survey of human and hominid prehistory spanning over two million years. Emphasis is on the origin and cultural evolution of the world’s first settled communities and early civilizations, including Mesopotamia, Egypt, India, China, Europe, Central America, and South America.

ANTH 165 Sex and Gender: Cross-Cultural Perspectives (3 units)

A survey of cross-cultural and historical factors influencing human sexuality, gender roles and identity. The course emphasizes non-Western culture such as Asian, African, and the Indigenous Americas. Diverse cultural forces affecting both female and male status, such as economics, religion, and sexual practices, will be examined.

ANTH 170 Anthropology of Death (3 units)

Examination of cross-cultural perspectives on beliefs and practices around death and dying. Selected topics may include funerary practices, cannibalism, bereavement and concepts of the afterlife.

ANTH 180 Magic, Witchcraft and Religion (3 units)

Cross-cultural exploration of the supernatural belief systems, focusing on non-literate, tribal and ethnic cultures; history and methods of the anthropological approach to religion; the dynamics of myth, magic, totem, taboo, cults, and sects.

ANTH 360 Native Peoples of North America (3 units)

An introduction to the life ways of representative Native North American culture groups found in different geographical areas of North America. Examines settlement patterns and environmental adaptations, social organizations, worldview, and the arts chronologically and cross culturally, with emphasis on the impact of contact with European cultures. Field trips may be arranged to investigate archaeological evidence.

Program Type Total Units
Anthropology for Transfer AA-T 60 Units

Upon completion of the program, students will be able to:

  • Summarize and interpret the main theories in Anthropology that offer various explanations and understandings of diverse cultural, archaeological and biological processes that impact societies. (CT; EC; CS)
  • Critically consider, analyze, and research special issues in Anthropology and their effects on culture and society. (CT; EC; IT)
  • Recognize the importance of, and practice ethical behavior in a professional anthropological, both within academia and within the community. (CS; L W)
  • Bring back into the community and apply the skills, abilities, and knowledge acquired in the Anthropology Program for the betterment of others and themselves, and to further the objectives of a deeper anthropological understanding of our world. (CS; L W).
Office Information

Location: Building 1
Email: socialsci-creativearts@smccd.edu
Phone: (650) 738-4122

Fall 2022 Courses

Type Status Title Days Time Instructor
Online Class IN
PROGRESS
ANTH 110 - 91211 - Cultural Anthropology
ANTH 110 Cultural Anthropology

A comparative analysis of human cultures with emphases on core concepts such as kinship, religion, politics, technology, and an appreciation of our societal variability. When appropriate, comparison is made with present-day American society to show the effect of societal diversity, size, and complexity of cultural factors.

Units: 3
Degree Credit
Grade Option (Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass)
  • Lecture hours/semester: 48-54
  • Homework hours/semester: 96-108
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None
AA/AS Degree Requirements: Area 5b; Area 9D3
Transfer Credit: CSU, UC (IGETC Area 4G)
C-ID: ANTH 120
TBA Slicton, L
Online Class IN
PROGRESS
ANTH 110 - 96310 - Cultural Anthropology
ANTH 110 Cultural Anthropology

A comparative analysis of human cultures with emphases on core concepts such as kinship, religion, politics, technology, and an appreciation of our societal variability. When appropriate, comparison is made with present-day American society to show the effect of societal diversity, size, and complexity of cultural factors.

Units: 3
Degree Credit
Grade Option (Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass)
  • Lecture hours/semester: 48-54
  • Homework hours/semester: 96-108
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None
AA/AS Degree Requirements: Area 5b; Area 9D3
Transfer Credit: CSU, UC (IGETC Area 4G)
C-ID: ANTH 120
TBA Slicton, L
Day Class   IN
PROGRESS
ANTH 110 - 90581 - Cultural Anthropology
ANTH 110 Cultural Anthropology

A comparative analysis of human cultures with emphases on core concepts such as kinship, religion, politics, technology, and an appreciation of our societal variability. When appropriate, comparison is made with present-day American society to show the effect of societal diversity, size, and complexity of cultural factors.

Units: 3
Degree Credit
Grade Option (Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass)
  • Lecture hours/semester: 48-54
  • Homework hours/semester: 96-108
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None
AA/AS Degree Requirements: Area 5b; Area 9D3
Transfer Credit: CSU, UC (IGETC Area 4G)
C-ID: ANTH 120
T Th 9:35am-10:50am Ulloa, J
Online Class IN
PROGRESS
ANTH 125 - 90208 - Physical Anthropology
ANTH 125 Physical Anthropology

Biological consideration of the origin, development, and potential survival of humans and other primates. Topics include concepts of evolution: natural selection and populations, patterns of inheritance, the fossil record, and behavioral adaptations. The course will examine how biological, physical, and cultural variations have allowed human populations to adapt to various physical environments.

Units: 3
Degree Credit
Letter Grade Only
  • Lecture hours/semester: 48-54
  • Homework hours/semester: 96-108
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None
AA/AS Degree Requirements: Area 9B2
Transfer Credit: CSU (CSU GE Area B2), UC (IGETC Area 5B)
C-ID: ANTH 110
TBA Slicton, L
Day Class   IN
PROGRESS
ANTH 125 - 85702 - Physical Anthropology
ANTH 125 Physical Anthropology

Biological consideration of the origin, development, and potential survival of humans and other primates. Topics include concepts of evolution: natural selection and populations, patterns of inheritance, the fossil record, and behavioral adaptations. The course will examine how biological, physical, and cultural variations have allowed human populations to adapt to various physical environments.

Units: 3
Degree Credit
Letter Grade Only
  • Lecture hours/semester: 48-54
  • Homework hours/semester: 96-108
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None
AA/AS Degree Requirements: Area 9B2
Transfer Credit: CSU (CSU GE Area B2), UC (IGETC Area 5B)
C-ID: ANTH 110
T Th 11:10am-12:25pm Cecil, C
Day Class   IN
PROGRESS
ANTH 127 - 94219 - Physical Anthropology Lab
ANTH 127 Physical Anthropology Laboratory

Laboratory designed to become familiar with the methods of the science of biological anthropology while investigating topics in laboratory and field situations. Topics covered in the course: the scientific method, biological variation and forces of evolution, human osteology and variation, comparative osteology of primates, and fossil evidence for human evolution. Field trips may be offered.

Units: 1
Degree Credit
Grade Option (Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass)
  • Lab hours/semester: 48-54
Prerequisites: Completion of, or concurrent enrollment in, ANTH 125 or equivalent.
Corequisites: None
Transfer Credit: CSU (CSU GE Area B3), UC (IGETC Area 5C)
C-ID: ANTH 115L
Th 2:00pm-5:00pm Cecil, C
Online Class IN
PROGRESS
ANTH 155 - 92444 - Human Prehistory/Rise of Civil
ANTH 155 Human Prehistory and the Rise of Civilization

An anthropological survey of human and hominid prehistory spanning over two million years. Emphasis is on the origin and cultural evolution of the world?s first settled communities and early civilizations, including Mesopotamia, Egypt, India, China, Europe, Central America, and South America.

Units: 3
Degree Credit
Grade Option (Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass)
  • Lecture hours/semester: 48-54
  • Homework hours/semester: 96-108
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None
AA/AS Degree Requirements: Area 5b; Area 9D1
Transfer Credit: CSU (CSU GE Area D), UC (IGETC Area 4G)
TBA Cecil, C
Online Class OPEN ANTH 165 - 93547 - Sex/Gender: Cross-Cultural Per
ANTH 165 Sex and Gender: Cross-Cultural Perspectives

A survey of cross-cultural and historical factors influencing human sexuality, gender roles and identity. The course emphasizes non-Western culture such as Asian, African, and the Indigenous Americas. Diverse cultural forces affecting both female and male status, such as economics, religion, and sexual practices, will be examined.

Units: 3
Degree Credit
Grade Option (Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass)
  • Lecture hours/semester: 48-54
  • Homework hours/semester: 96-108
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None
AA/AS Degree Requirements: Area 5b; Area 9D1
Transfer Credit: CSU (CSU GE Area D), UC (IGETC Area 4G)
TBA Slicton, L
Online Class IN
PROGRESS
ANTH 180 - 90582 - Magic, Science & Religion
ANTH 180 Magic, Witchcraft and Religion

Cross-cultural exploration of the supernatural belief systems, focusing on non-literate, tribal and ethnic cultures; history and methods of the anthropological approach to religion; the dynamics of myth, magic, totem, taboo, cults, and sects.

Units: 3
Degree Credit
Grade Option (Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass)
  • Lecture hours/semester: 48-54
  • Homework hours/semester: 96-108
Prerequisites: None
Corequisites: None
AA/AS Degree Requirements: Area 5b; Area 9C1
Transfer Credit: CSU (CSU GE Area D), UC (IGETC Area 4G)
TBA Slicton, L

Primary Contact

Social Science Creative Arts
Social Science Creative Arts (Account for Social Sci/Creative Arts)
Social Science|Creative Arts-Division Office
socialsci-creativearts@smccd.edu
More details »

Anthropology Faculty

Lori Slicton
Lori Slicton (Professor)
Social Science|Creative Arts-Anthropology
slicton@smccd.edu More details »
Chuck Cecil
Chuck Cecil (Adjunct Faculty )
Social Science|Creative Arts-Anthropology
cecilc@smccd.edu More details »

Dean & Division Assistant

Danni Redding Lapuz
Danni Redding Lapuz (Dean)
Social Science|Creative Arts-Division Office
reddinglapuzd@smccd.edu More details »
Kathy Fitzpatrick
Kathy Fitzpatrick (Division Assistant)
Social Science|Creative Arts-Division Office
fitzpatrickk@smccd.edu More details »